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2 edition of physiology of nodule development of some Leguminosae. found in the catalog.

physiology of nodule development of some Leguminosae.

John Stewart Pate

physiology of nodule development of some Leguminosae.

by John Stewart Pate

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Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph. D.)--The Queen"s University of Belfast, 1956.

The Physical Object
Pagination1 v
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20337067M

A first scenario is that the ancient ancestors of Aeschynomene originally initiated nodule formation via an NF-independent process and that, later, some species acquired an NF-dependent pathway (e.g. A. afraspera). The second scenario is that the ancestors of CI group 3 originally initiated nodulation with an NF-dependent process, but later   The Biology of Frankia and Actinorhizal Plants provides a comprehensive review of Frankia and the actinorhizal plants. It reviews the state of knowledge on all aspects from molecular genetics through ecology to practical applications; describes methods used in research and practical applications; and is a guide to the ://

  CiteScore: ℹ CiteScore: CiteScore measures the average citations received per peer-reviewed document published in this title. CiteScore values are based on citation counts in a range of four years (e.g. ) to peer-reviewed documents (articles, reviews, conference papers, data papers and book chapters) published in the same four calendar years, divided by the number of   root nodules plant. FAQ. Medical Information Search. English. English Español Português Français Italiano Svenska Deutsch

About this book Nitrogen is arguably the most important nutrient required by plants. However, the availability of nitrogen is limited in many soils and although the earth's atmosphere consists of % nitrogen gas (N2) plants are unable to use this form of :// Some of their new reports are on species of genera widely reported as nodulating. Others are on new genera, from sections of the Leguminosae that include nonnodulating genera. Because the criteria on which their nodule identification was based were not given, it is difficult to evaluate these ://


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Physiology of nodule development of some Leguminosae by John Stewart Pate Download PDF EPUB FB2

This interpretation was based upon superficial resemblances in structure and behaviour between the mature nodule and lateral root, and anatomists were not slow to point out structural discrepancies, in particular the non-pericyclic origin of most nodules, the peripheral vascular system TheCajanus indicus root nodule organism is placed by various authors Löhnis and Leonard, in the Cowpea group, the members of which have got an alkaline reaction on milk medium and also on nearly all sugars.

The organism ofC. indicus isolated by us differs in this respect from the members of the Cowpea group in having acid reaction on litmus milk, and mixed reactions on sugars, acidic and   et al. () and Cocking et al. () were able to induce the development of nodule on non-legumes by treating roots with a cell wall degrading enzyme mixture followed by inoculation with The tribe Phaseoleae, of the sub-family Papilionoideae of the Leguminosae, shows distinct differences from the tribes Vicieae and Trifolieae in nodule morphology and anatomy.

Nodules of the Phaseoleae have determinate growth as, at maturity, the vascular strands fuse at the apex forming, effectively, a closed loop of the root stele. Nodules of the Vicieae and Trifolieae have an apical meristem, Recent findings on legume biogeography and the timing of evolution of key legume tribes have supported a new view of the evolution of nodule processes.

It is suggested that an initial physiology of nodule development of some Leguminosae. book process not involving root hairs led to two branches of legume nodule development, one that HISTOLOGY AND NODULE DEVELOPMENT.

In the most studied legumes, infection occurs via an infection thread that takes the bacteria through the root hair into the root cortex and distributes them to cells, which become the infected cells of the nitrogen-fixing nodule (Fig. 1).The root zone susceptible to invasion is located behind the root tip where root hairs are still growing and competent for The size and characteristics of the family Leguminosae are outlined, with a key to the 3 subfamilies.

Rhizobia are characterized in pure culture and various aspects of Rhizobium-plant associations are discussed, as well as the concept of cross inoculation grouping and its significance.

An elementary account of nodule formation and types is given, and reasons for nodule absence and the inherent Some rhizobia will fix N 2 ex planta but only when the microaerobic conditions, i.e., less than % O 2, existing in the nodule are simulated.

The low O 2 requirement mimics in nodules the role of leghemoglobin, which is to supply a high flux of O 2 at a low concentration to the bacteroids for metabolism without causing nitrogenase ://   Suppression of nodule development of one side of a split-root system of soybeans caused by prior inoculation of the other side.

Plant Physiology. ; – [PMC free article] [Google Scholar] Krusell L, Madsen LH, Sato S, et al. Shoot control of root development and nodulation is mediated by a receptor-like kinase. :// The surface of turgid, nitrogen-fixing soybean root nodules is found to contain a number of prominent ridges on an otherwise smooth surface.

Using the technique of critical point drying for tissue preparation, and scanning electron microscopy, these ridges were found to be lenticels, whose function is to permit the free movement of gases into and out of the ://   By controlling nodule development in this way, the host plant can balance its need to acquire nitrogen against its ability to expend energy establishing and maintaining nodules.

Supernodulating plants lacking AON are typically developmentally-stunted (when inoculated with a compatible rhizobia strain) and yield poorly as a result of this /the-development-and-regulation-of-soybean-nodules.

The region of the root of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. Bragg) susceptible to nodule initiation by Bradyrhizobium japonicum Jordan USDA was examined by serial section and light microscopy to study the control of nodule successive susceptible regions separated by h intervals were examined.

Infection foci were catalogued within defined stages of nodule development   the timing of their expression-during nodule development (8, 10). The late nodulin genes comprise a large group of genes that are expressed around the onset of nitrogen :// Comparative phenotypic analysis of pea (Pisum sativum) s ym35 mutants and Lotus japonicus nin mutants suggested a similar function for the PsSym35 and LjNin genes in early stages of root nodule formation.

Both the pea and L. japonicus mutants are non-nodulating but normal in their arbuscular mycorrhizal association. Both are characterized by excessive root hair curling in response to the   [nitiation, development and structure of root nodules of cells transforms into the bacteroid zone (Bz) and the peripheral layers luto nodule cortex (NC) with distinct apical meristematic zone (MZ) (figure 13).

The ruptured threads even after liberating the bacteria remain in the developing nodule Although it is well established that the plant host encodes and synthesizes the apoprotein for leghemoglobin in root nodules, the source of the heme moiety has been uncertain. We recently found that the transcript for coproporphyrinogen III oxidase, one of the later enzymes of heme synthesis, is highly elevated in soybean (Glycine max L.) nodules compared with Sprent, J.I.

() Root nodule anatomy, type of export product and evolutionary origin of some Leguminosae. Plant, Cell and Environment, 3, 35– Google Scholar The Fabaceae or Leguminosae, [6] commonly known as the legume, pea, or bean family, are a large and economically important family of flowering includes trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants perennials or annuals, which are easily recognized by their fruit and their compound, stipulated leaves.

The group is widely distributed and is the third-largest land plant family in terms of   In response to nitrogen starvation, plants from the Leguminosae family can establish symbiosis with their Rhizobium partners resulting in the development of root nodules and within the nodule plant cells, the conversion of the bacteria into nitrogen fixing bacteroids.

For the initiation of the symbiosis and finding the appropriate Rhizobium bacterium in the soil, legume plants excrete from Subsequently, the primordium develops into a consistently organized root nodule. The mature nodule consists of a central tissue, containing infected and uninfected cells, surrounded by a peripheral tissue.

The latter tissue is supplemented with the vascular traces that connect the nodule with the central cylinder of the subtending ://. Some of the fundamental biological questions, such as the origin of legume-characteristic traits, require an evolutionary approach that encompasses the entire legume family.

Such traits include reproductive development (especially floral and pod development), the origin of nodulation, and the evolution and importance of   A detailed account of ineffective nodule development in M.

sativa inoculated with leucine-requiring mutants (Leu −) of R. meliloti was recently published (Truchet et al., ). These form small, spherical, ineffective nodules with limited meristematic activity in which the ability to release from the infection thread is ://Moreover, the action of NIN is essential for nodule development to occur in CCaMK and cytokinin receptor spontaneous nodulation mutants and it has been suggested that NIN is activated following the activation of CCaMK and the cytokinin receptor (Tirichine et al.; Marsh et al.

).